University General Course Catalog 2022-2023 
    
    Jun 19, 2024  
University General Course Catalog 2022-2023 ARCHIVED CATALOG: LINKS AND CONTENT ARE OUT OF DATE. CHECK WITH YOUR ADVISOR.

Gender, Race, and Identity, M.A


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Drawing upon the scholarly literature in the areas of critical theory, feminist methodology and particular disciplines, including race and ethnic studies, women and gender studies, sexuality studies and social justice, the Gender, Race, and Identity M.A. provides an academic course of study in the intersections of identities that shape our lives and experiences. In their coursework, students focus on key theories about power, oppression, diversity and equity, as well as interdisciplinary methods and tools for critical thinking, communication, scholarly contributions, and/or project management and execution around a range of social issues. The M.A. enables students to take a range of courses that provide in-depth understanding of a particular area of the student's choosing and provides ample opportunities for application of new knowledge. The curriculum is designed to allow for flexibility for students to focus on topics and issues of importance to their professional development while they gain breadth and depth in the study of important intersections of race, class and gender.

Three specializations are offered within the degree program:

  • Applied Community Studies
  • Interdisciplinary Studies - Non-thesis plan
  • Interdisciplinary Studies - Thesis Plan

Contact Information


Emily Hobson, Ph.D., Graduate Advisor
ehobson@unr.edu
(775) 682-6482

Mailing Address
Department of Gender, Race, and Identity
1664 N. Virginia Street, Mail Stop 0046
Reno, NV 89557-0046

Department Website:
https://www.unr.edu/gender-race-identity

Program Objectives/Student Learning Outcomes


During and upon completion of this program, students will:

  1. Demonstrate familiarity with a range of interdisciplinary critical theories and methods and their applications for the study of identities, representation, oppression, and social change.
  2. Identify and articulate complex social issues, structures, ideologies, and relationships that frame critical discourses, policies, and lived experiences.
  3. Demonstrate applied critical writing and communication skills appropriate to a range of academic, community, and professional settings.

Admissions Requirement


Applicants to the M. A. program should hold or expect to receive a bachelor’s degree from an accredited four-year university. Potential applicants for the M. A. should talk with the Director of Graduate Studies to determine how they might prepare to apply.

Students pursuing the Masters of Arts degree must satisfy all graduate school requirements and specific departmental requirements. The department deadline for application is February 1 for fall admission. Candidates must provide the following application materials to the department:

  • Graduate admission application form, including fees
  • Official college transcripts
  • A brief statement of purpose and goals
  • Two sealed letters of recommendation

A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (unless the applicant has demonstrated unusual promise during his or her junior and senior years) is also required for admission to Graduate Standing in Gender, Race, and Identity.

I. Program Requirements


General requirements:

  • A minimum of 21 units must be earned in residence.
  • All M.A. students are required to take some portion of the coursework at the 700-level or above.
  • In the interdisciplinary studies emphasis (thesis and non-thesis plans) and applied community studies emphasis (non-thesis plan), at least 17 units must be completed in courses numbered 700 or above.
  • The M.A. program requires a comprehensive exam as part of the degree requirements. In general the exam is an oral exam covering the professional paper, portfolio, project, or thesis. Students must register for 1 unit of GRI 795, the semester they will be completing their exams.

A. Applied Community Studies Emphasis (31 units)


In addition to core and elective coursework, students pursue internships with community partners and, in consultation with their committee chair, will complete a professional paper or project. 

1. Core Seminars (9 units)


Three GRI graduate seminars (9 units) are required to be selected from the following:

2. Interdisciplinary Electives (12-18 units)


At least 12 units of GRI or interdisciplinary electives must be taken at the 600-700-level.

These courses may be any GRI courses or graduate level courses in related fields from a range of disciplines including but not limited to Sociology, History, English, Anthropology, Communication Studies, Art, Education, Social Work, Geography, and Health Sciences. GRI seminars not taken to fulfill the Core Seminars requirement can be taken as Interdisciplinary Electives.

Courses are selected in consultation with the student’s committee chair or the Director of Graduate Studies. 

3. Internship (3-9 units)


At least 3 and up to 9 units of graduate internship credit with community partners. Students are responsible for finding their own internship partners and obtaining approval, before registering for course credit.

4. Comprehensive Examination (1 unit)


The comprehensive exam consists of presentation of the design and execution of the Applied Community Practice Project and an oral defense.

B. Interdisciplinary Studies Emphasis (Non-Thesis) (31 units)


In addition to core and elective coursework, students will complete a professional paper or portfolio.

1. Core Seminars (9 units)


Three GRI graduate seminars (9 units) are required, to be selected from the following:

2. Interdisciplinary Electives (21 units)


21 units of GRI or interdisciplinary electives must be taken at the 600-700-level.

These courses may be any GRI courses or graduate level courses in related fields from a range of disciplines including but not limited to Sociology, History, English, Anthropology, Communication Studies, Art, Education, Social Work, Geography, and Health Sciences. GRI seminars not taken to fulfill the Core Seminars requirement can be taken as Interdisciplinary Electives.

Courses are selected in consultation with the student’s committee chair or the Director of Graduate Studies. 

3. Comprehensive Examination (1 unit)


The exam consists of presentation of a project, professional paper, or portfolio and its oral defense.

C. Interdisciplinary Studies Emphasis (Thesis) (31 units)


In addition to core and elective coursework, students research and write an interdisciplinary thesis.

1. Core Seminars (9 units)


Three GRI graduate seminars (9 units) are required, to be selected from the following:

2. Interdisciplinary Electives (15 units)


15 units of GRI or interdisciplinary electives must be taken at the 600-700-level.

These courses may be any GRI courses or graduate level courses in related fields from a range of disciplines including but not limited to Sociology, History, English, Anthropology, Communication Studies, Art, Education, Social Work, Geography, and Health Sciences. GRI seminars not taken to fulfill the Core Seminars requirement can be taken as Interdisciplinary Electives.

Courses are selected in consultation with the student’s committee chair or the Director of Graduate Studies. 

3. Thesis (6 units)


Thesis credits (minimum 6 units) are awarded for independent work on the design and writing of the thesis project in consultation with the committee chair.

4. Comprehensive Examination (1 unit)


The comprehensive exam is the presentation of the thesis and its oral defense.

II. Total Units (31 Units)


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